Imported

  1. Buck Fever Hits A Snag

    I suddenly caught some movement in the bottom of the draw...it was white...could it be a tail? I grabbed my spotter and pulled the gun saddle rest off the tripod. I attached the spotter and dialed it in. My prayers were answered. There he was! I had not laid eyes on him hard horned this year. His antlers were darker and way heavier than I had expected. I quickly got Rick into his shooting position. If the deer kept going the same direction it would be a 509 yard shot. Snag was feeding and...
  2. Outdoorsmans Rifle Chassis System Review

    The Kitchen Table Gunsmith Real gunsmiths call guys like me “coffee table gunsmiths”, meaning I know just enough to get myself into trouble! But with an out-of-the-box Remington 700 ADL, I have all the skill necessary to assemble a complete rifle with the Outdoorsmans Chassis System, and here is the visual proof in photos. By the way, in case you were wondering, the following photos were taken in my kitchen and all the work was performed on my kitchen table. This Remington 700 ADL is...
  3. Grandpa's Varmint Rifles

    218 Bee, 1939 to date The 218 Bee arrived in 1939 as a commercial cartridge offered by Winchester for their Model 65 lever action. The case is based on the 25-20 Winchester cartridge necked down to 22 caliber and, although it has a shorter case than the Hornet, it holds more powder. Some expected it to be the demise of the 22 Hornet, but that was not to be the case. Although the performance of the Bee exceeds the Hornet and is just as accurate, this is another cartridge whose sales were...
  4. Shooting Apps Review

    Now, Applied Ballistics, the program that I have not mentioned yet, is a $29.99 app and includes pretty much all of the functions that I really like having, like reticle placement, graphical display, table and a solution screen (without MOA and Mils on the same screen). This program does all of this flawlessly and produces as accurate of a result as the data you put into it. My greatest regret about this program is not merging my iTunes accounts and putting this on my new phone! Deciding...
  5. All About Riflescope Reticles

    Circle/CQT/CQC: These used to be nearly exclusive residents of the realm of shotgun scopes but someone figured out that they make brilliant combat reticles as they're super fast and easy to use. Put your target in the circle and kill it. Simple. The open design is good for situational awareness as well. Now we're starting to see really clever things like circle reticles being placed in the second focal plane and a secondary crosshair or scaled reticle being placed in the first focal plane...
  6. All About Riflescope Reticles

    First Focal Plane: First focal plane reticles are necessary if you want to use a reticle for estimating range to target and to be able to do so at any of the available magnification levels of your optic without having to take additional steps in the math or limitations such as setting the magnification to a specific level. FFP reticles are wildly popular in the tactical/tacticool/sniper/long-range worlds where you're shooting for hits rather than for X's. FFP scopes will be more expensive...
  7. All About Riflescope Reticles

    All About Riflescope Reticles By MeccaStreisand A reticle is simply a set of markings inside an optical device for use in measuring, pointing, aiming, etc... My 8" Newtonian telescope comes with an eyepiece that you can use for aligning the telescope with the Earth properly so its drive motor pre-programming can drive it to pre-determined astronomical points of interest automatically. Inside that eyepiece is a reticle of sorts, there are several stars and constellations. You adjust the...
  8. Shooting Apps Review

    Shooting Apps Review By Nate Demiter As an avid long range hunter, I have used and attempted many different styles of shooting ranging from the traditional field data to extremely high tech ballistic applications. My previous experience has led me to thoroughly question how we as marksmen and hunters use and manipulate that data. I began long range hunting by collecting my field data at the range and using the holdover method with a Mil reticle. I found this to be less than satisfactory...
  9. Shooting Apps Review

    Strelok Pro Strelok Pro offers the exact same functionality and possibly a more precise ballistic solution over Shooter. Strelok also includes a reticle picture customizable to all of the major long range scopes like Vortex, Nightforce and Schmidt and Bender. That is a great feature to have as well. The solution displays as MOA, Mil, inches and clicks on the same screen, but you have to manually input yardage in numerical values i.e. 1000 yds or 1025 yds. This may not be a big deal to a lot...
  10. Outdoorsmans Rifle Chassis System Review

    Style, Action, & Stock The Outdoorsmans Chassis System employs the AR-style pistol grip (but not the beavertail types), of which I’ve always been a huge fan. Pure target shooters may argue the ergonomics of this hand position and its effect on accuracy, but the improved control over the rifle is undeniable. The vertical orientation and the ability to wrap your shooting hand completely around the grip just feels better to me. The first generation Outdoorsmans Chassis System is currently...
  11. Grandpa's Varmint Rifles

    22 Hornet, 1930 to date The 22 Hornet started life in the mid-1920s as a very popular wildcat cartridge. Using the 22 WCF case, experimenters developed what would turn out to be the 22 Hornet. Because of the wildcat’s reputation Winchester introduced the cartridge in 1930, before any factory rifles were available. The Hornet case was made slightly longer than the 22 WCF to prevent it from being chambered in a 22 WCF rifle. Two years later, in 1932, Winchester introduced the Model 54 bolt...
  12. Grandpa's Varmint Rifles

    Grandpa’s Varmint Rifles ©By Glenn Burroughs A quick glance at a 22 Hornet round is sufficient time to realize this cartridge has been around for a long time. The rimmed base and sloping shoulder angle offer two strong clues that denote its antiquity. Can this be the oldest center-fire varmint cartridge with ammo still available at the sporting goods store? An old box of 22 WCF cartridges, note that they are very difficult to distinguish from 22 Hornets. Curiosity was such that I decided...
  13. Andy's Elk Gear

    LRH Field Editor Andy Backus breaks down his personal elk hunting gear The images below are from My 2015 DIY Rifle Elk Hunt in Colorado during the first rifle season from October 10th though the 14th. The bull was killed at 11,600'. Len Backus' Long Range Rifles – Mountain Rifle - 6.5x284, 140 grain Berger Hybrids Huskemaw 4-16x42 Blue Diamond Scope - I appreciate the 22 oz weight of this scope on a rugged mountain hunt compared to over 30 oz for most Nightforce scopes. I used a custom...
  14. Frankford Arsenal Case Trim & Prep Center Review

    For the second test I dug up some old 6.5 Creedmoor cases that I had recently retired after 15 firings. This brass had measured within .001” to the shoulder datum on the previous reload and I knew it could eliminate any inconsistencies due to differing head to shoulder lengths. Also, the CTPC cutter felt a little dull on my first test so I replaced it with the cutter out of my RCBS trimmer to see if that would help as well for the second test. Setting up the machine for the Creedmoor cases...
  15. RCBS Trim Pro-2 Manual Case Trimmer Review

    A sized case that has an overall length close to what is desired (preferably longer) is used to make the first adjustment. The case is inserted into the case holder by pressing down on the handle lever and pushing the base of the case into the two jaws in the case holder. The jaws hold the case firm and aligned. Still holding the arm lightly, the pilot is moved into the case neck and the lever released . With the cutter head touching the case neck, slide the bushings until they touch the...
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