Articles

  1. Shooting Apps Review

    Shooting Apps Review By Nate Demiter As an avid long range hunter, I have used and attempted many different styles of shooting ranging from the traditional field data to extremely high tech ballistic applications. My previous experience has led me to thoroughly question how we as marksmen and hunters use and manipulate that data. I began long range hunting by collecting my field data at the...
  2. Grandpa's Varmint Rifles

    22 Hornet, 1930 to date The 22 Hornet started life in the mid-1920s as a very popular wildcat cartridge. Using the 22 WCF case, experimenters developed what would turn out to be the 22 Hornet. Because of the wildcat’s reputation Winchester introduced the cartridge in 1930, before any factory rifles were available. The Hornet case was made slightly longer than the 22 WCF to prevent it from...
  3. Grandpa's Varmint Rifles

    Grandpa’s Varmint Rifles ©By Glenn Burroughs A quick glance at a 22 Hornet round is sufficient time to realize this cartridge has been around for a long time. The rimmed base and sloping shoulder angle offer two strong clues that denote its antiquity. Can this be the oldest center-fire varmint cartridge with ammo still available at the sporting goods store? An old box of 22 WCF cartridges,...
  4. Andy's Elk Gear

    LRH Field Editor Andy Backus breaks down his personal elk hunting gear The images below are from My 2015 DIY Rifle Elk Hunt in Colorado during the first rifle season from October 10th though the 14th. The bull was killed at 11,600'. Len Backus' Long Range Rifles – Mountain Rifle - 6.5x284, 140 grain Berger Hybrids Huskemaw 4-16x42 Blue Diamond Scope - I appreciate the 22 oz weight of this...
  5. Frankford Arsenal Case Trim & Prep Center Review

    For the second test I dug up some old 6.5 Creedmoor cases that I had recently retired after 15 firings. This brass had measured within .001” to the shoulder datum on the previous reload and I knew it could eliminate any inconsistencies due to differing head to shoulder lengths. Also, the CTPC cutter felt a little dull on my first test so I replaced it with the cutter out of my RCBS trimmer to...
  6. RCBS Trim Pro-2 Manual Case Trimmer Review

    A sized case that has an overall length close to what is desired (preferably longer) is used to make the first adjustment. The case is inserted into the case holder by pressing down on the handle lever and pushing the base of the case into the two jaws in the case holder. The jaws hold the case firm and aligned. Still holding the arm lightly, the pilot is moved into the case neck and the lever...
  7. Tuning a 221 Remington Fireball

    But there was one final chapter… the next group of targets were addressed by those rounds loaded with 55-grain Noslers and 17.5 grains of Accurate 2250. The bullets were seated at different depths; touching the lands, then .005, .010, .015, .020 and .025-inch off the lands. As the first round was slipped into the chamber I thought to myself, “If those 40-grain bullets are shooting that well...
  8. RCBS Trim Pro-2 Manual Case Trimmer Review

    RCBS Trim Pro-2 Manual Case Trimmer Review ©2016 By Glenn Burroughs My old case trimmer was made before micrometer adjustments were available, so each adjustment for case length was basically an educated guess… I just kept adjusting until the magical setting was hit. But after trimming several expensive cases too short I decided it might be time for an upgrade. The search was begun for a...
  9. Frankford Arsenal Case Trim & Prep Center Review

    For the review I had a friend give me over 100 pieces of 2x fired 243 Winchester brass that needed to be trimmed. Before trimming, all the brass was thoroughly cleaned using stainless steel tumbling media and allowed to dry completely. The proper bushing and collet were selected as mentioned in the previous paragraph. I then followed the instructions to get the trimmer set up. The bushing...
  10. Frankford Arsenal Case Trim & Prep Center Review

    Frankford Arsenal Case Trim & Prep Center Review By Justin Hyer Trimming cases is my least favorite part of the reloading process. Traditional hand powered trimmers are slow to operate and take up a decent amount of space on my reloading bench for a tool that doesn’t need to be used every time a batch of brass is processed. Powered versions of the same trimmers can speed up the process but...
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